donderdag 25 juli 2013

Midnight Special (1926) / Let The Church Roll On (1925)



"Midnight Special" is a traditional folk song thought to have originated among prisoners in the American South. The title comes from the refrain which refers to the passenger train Midnight Special and its "ever-loving light" (sometimes "ever-living light").
Let the Midnight Special shine her light on me,
Let the Midnight Special shine her ever-loving light on me. (Traditional)
The song is historically performed in the country-blues style from the viewpoint of the prisoner and has been covered by many artists.

There seems to be general agreement that it was a train, but beyond that, ideas vary.
In "Fireside Book of Favorite American Songs" it says: Many legends are connected with this jail song. One, told by Pete Seeger, is the belief among some of the prisoners that if the light from the midnight special, as it passed the prison, should fall on a man sleeping in his cell, that man would go free.

"The American Songbag" (Carl Sandburg) has two versions, each with its own explanation.

One version on page 26: And her man considers that he has twenty years yet to serve, he cries out that he would rather be under the wheels of a fast midnight train.

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And the second version on page 217: A fast train, such as "The Midnight Special," means a getaway, outside air, freedom. And it's this particular version, that was copied by various artists.


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During the 1950's folksong revival, a favorite at hootenannies and concerts was this Texas prisoner's song. The Lomaxes wrote that the Midnight Special was the Golden Gate Limited, departing from Houston's Southern Pacific depot at midnight for San Antonio, El Paso, and points west.  Thirty miles out of Houston, the Midnight Special shone its light through the barred windows at the Texas state prison farm at Sugarland, reminding the inmates of the light and freedom on the other side of the prison walls.

BUT: 
The Midnight Special was the name of a passenger train formerly operated by the Chicago and Alton Railroad and its successor, the Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad. The train ran on an overnight schedule, and in later years carried the last regularly scheduled Pullman sleeping car between Chicago, Illinois and St. Louis, Missouri. The train made its final run on April 30, 1971, although Amtrak continued several other passenger trains over the same route traversed by the Midnight Special.

The first recorded version of the song "Midnight Special" by Dave Cutrell was recorded in St Louis, so there's the connection to the Midnight Special that drove from Chicago to St Louis.
So the Midnight Special is NOT the same train as in the famous Leadbelly song "Midnight Special" 

Some have written that the song refers to the Southern Pacific's Golden Gate Limited, but NO train by that name ever ran on the Southern Pacific.
More likely Leadbelly's version refers to the Missouri Pacific's Houston to New Orleans train called the HOUSTONIAN which departed Houston's Union Station shortly before midnight.


In an engrossing examination titled "A Who's Who of "The Midnight Special,'" Texas folklorist Mack McCormick traced the individuals named in some versions of the song (especially Leadbelly's) to a 1923 incident.  Jack Smith, a bank robber sentenced to twenty-five years' hard labor, broke out of the Houston county jail while waiting for the transfer man, Uncle Bud Russell, who was due to arrive shortly to take him to the state penitentiary. Smith was captured a few hours later by Houston sheriff T.A. Binfor. Four other Houston law officers of that time were memorialized in one of Leadbelly's stanzas.
Bason an' Brock will arrest you,
Payton and Boone will take you down,
Oh, the judge will sentence you,
Penitentiary bound.(4)

McCormick's researches do not prove that the "The Midnight Special" originated at the time of this 1923 jailbreak. It seems more probable that Leadbelly and others set the details of that event into the framework of an earlier, well-established traditional song. The strongest evidence for this assumption is that the song appeared widely throughout the South within a very few years after 1923, and invariably in versions that did not mention any of the individuals associated with the Houston events of 1923. That some elements of "The Midnight Special" are far older than the song as a whole is attested by verses in the "Grade Song" that was printed by Howard W. Odum in 1911 in "Folk-Song and Folk-Poetry as Found in the Secular Songs of the Southern Negroes." JAF24 (Oct-Dec 1911,

Especially one of the last verses is literally copied in "Midnight Special"

"Get up in mornin' when ding dong rings,
Look at table - see same damn things".


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The earliest reference to the song was in a letter to Robert W. Gordon, then conducting the column "Old Songs That Men Have Sung" in Adventure magazine. Dated August 3, 1923, the letter requested additional verses of the song, and gave one verse ("If you go to the city, you better go right . . .") and chorus.
As I said Carl Sandburg published two variants in his 1927 anthology American Songbag, both without attribution. A frequent source of Sandburg's material was Robert W. Gordon's immense manuscript collection of folksongs, gathered during the several years' correspondence with readers in his column. Another of Gordon's correspondents, Terril McKay, sent Gordon a song he called simple "Jail Song" that he had heard several years earlier, in the fall of 1923, in the Harris County Jail in Houston. Except for a few adjustments in the use of dialect, and the change of Judge Robinson's name to Judge Nelson, this song is identical with one of the two that Sandburg printed )p.217). Gordon himself printed a fragment of the song in one of a series of columns on folksongs that he published in the New York times in 1927. In McKay's version, Sheriff Binford became T. Bentley.

The first commercial recording of "The Midnight Special" was made in 1926, by Dave Cutrell, with McGinty's Oklahoma Cowboy Band for the OKeh label.
Cutrell follows the traditional song except for semi-comedic stanzas about McGinty and Gray and "a cowboy band"


PISTOL PETE'S MIDNIGHT SPECIAL

Chorus and 1st. verse:
Wake up in the mornin', hear the ding-dong ring,
Go marchin' to the table and there's the same old thing.
Let the Midnight Special shine her light on me.
Let the Midnight Special shine her ever-loving light on me.

Yonder comes my woman. How do you know?
I can tell her by her apron and the dress she wore.
Umbrella on her shoulder, piece of paper in her hand,
Marching down to the captain, she says, "I wants my man."
Chorus:

I never had the blues so in all my life before,
Than when my baby left me, at the jailhouse door.
Oh, she left me crying, the tears rolled down her face,
Says, "I'd rather see you dead, boy, than in this place."
Chorus:

Now, Mister McGinty is a good man,
But he's run away now with a cowboy band.
Chorus:

Now Otto Gray, he's a Stillwater man.
But he's manager now of a cowboy band.
Chorus:

When you get to the city, boys, you better have the [bail?],
Or the law, they'll arrest you, and they'll put you in jail.
The judge he'll fine you, they'll shake you down,
If you haven't got the money, boys, you're jailhouse bound.
Chorus:

If you got a good man, woman, you better keep him at home,
For those city women won't leave him alone.
They'll paint and powder, they sure look swell,
And the first thing you know, woman, your man's gone to h---.
Chorus:

(o) Dave Cutrell: "Pistol Pete's Midnight Special,"
Dave Cutrell: vocal; probably accompanied by own guitar.
Recorded May 11, 1926, in St. Louis, MO;
OKeh Master 9650-A,
Released on OKeh 45057, ca. Sept. 1926.
(Despite the label credit to McGinty's Oklahoma Cow Boy Band as accompanists, the instrumentation is as shown, the B-side of Okeh 45057 however, is by McGinty's Oklahoma Cow Boy Band).

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Here's a picture of Dave Cutrell with mandolin.

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Listen to "Pistol Pete's Midnight Special" here:




Billy McGinty was not a musician, but he was an early cowboy and a member of Teddy Roosevelt's "Rough Riders." Billy McGinty organized and possibly financed this group but may not have been one of the musicians.
Otto Gray was the real director of this group.

SEE PAGE 8 and 9 of the following PDF-file for information on Otto Gray's group and a photograph of him and his group. Dave Cutrell is possibly the cowboy with the mandolin second from right on the photograph.

http://digital.library.okstate.edu/oktoday/1950s/1959/oktdv9n4.pdf


In March 1929, the band, now Otto Gray and the Oklahoma Cowboys, recorded the song again, this time with the traditional title, using only the traditional lyrics. It was released on Vocalion 5337.

Otto Gray And His Cowboy Band* - I Can't Change It / Midnight Special (Shellac) at Discogs


Earlier in the same year (in March 1926) there was a recording by Greening's Dance Orchestra (a dance-orchestra from London, UK).
Their "On The Midnight Special" has a rather different melody; only Lionel Rothery's sparse vocal line more than halfway through the performance taps from the same source as all the American Midnight Specials: "On the Midnight Special, Shine a light on me..." The English melody is credited to Irving King, which is probably an alias for Jimmy Campbell and Reginald Connelly, authors of "Try A Little Tenderness" and "If I Had You".

"On The Midnight Special" was recorded on March 6, 1926
Released on Imperial 1590 (matrix 4536-1)

Greening's Dance Orchestra - On The Midnight Special / Barcelona (Shellac) at Discogs

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Listen here (at about 2 min and 15 sec) in the next musicfile:



3 days later the same orchestra recorded the same song under the alias Mimosa Dance Orchestra.
Released on Mimosa P-19 (Matrix E-189)

http://www.mgthomas.co.uk/dancebands/Labels/LabelPages/Mimosa.htm



Although later versions place the locale of the song near Houston, early versions such as "Walk Right In Belmont" (Wilmer Watts; Frank Wilson, 1927) and "North Carolina Blues" (Roy Martin, 1930) — both essentially the same song as "Midnight Special" — place it in North Carolina


(c) Watts and Wilson "Walk Right In Belmont" (1927) on Paramount 3019-A

At their April 1927 session in Chicago, Watts and Wilson, accompanied by Charles H. Freshour on guitar, waxed seven selections, one of which, "Walk Right in Belmont", is a reworking of "Midnight Special",  Freshour, who reportedly wrote "Walk Right in Belmont", probably sings lead on this recording. Paramount released "Walk Right in Belmont" in its new “Old Time Tunes” series, credited only to “Watts and Wilson,” on the A-side of the next 78:

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Here's "Walk Right In Belmont"





(c) Roy Martin (= Lewis McDaniels) and his Guitar (1930) (as "North Carolina Blues")
Recorded March 28, 1930 in New York.
Released on Jewel 20006, Oriole 8006, Perfect 144 and Romeo 5006.

Listen here (especially THE LYRICS)




Listen here to a sample:

http://www.allmusic.com/song/north-carolina-blues-mt0007608638





http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=4165


And here are some more versions of " Midnight Special"


(c) Sam Collins (1927) (as "MIDNIGHT SPECIAL BLUES")
Date: September 17, 1927
Matrix: G13035
Released on Gennett Label: 6307

Sam Collins version also follows the traditional style. His is the first to name the woman in the story, Little Nora, and he refers to the Midnight Special's "ever-living" light.

Yonder come a Little Nora. How in the world do you know?
I know by the apron and the dress she wears.


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Listen here:



http://www.wirz.de/music/collifrm.htm



(c) Romeo Nelson (1930) (as "1129 Blues (The Midnight Special)")
Recorded Feb 1930 in Chicago.
This rare recording by Romeo Nelson, was released on the Vocalion-label:

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Listen here:





(c) Bill Cox (1933)
Bill Cox (vocal, harmomica and guitar)
Recorded August 30, 1933 in New York
Released on 7 different labels: Banner 32891, Melotone M12797, Melotone (Canadian) 91653, Oriole 8271, Perfect 12942, Romeo 5271, Conqueror 8230, Panachord 25626

Listen here:




http://vintage-harmonica.blogspot.nl/2010/06/bill-cox_25.html



(c) Fiddlin’ John Carson (1934) (as "Stockade Blues")
Recorded February 28, 1934 in Camden NJ.
Fiddlin' John Carson: guitar and vocals
Moonshine Kate: guitar and vocals
Marion "Peanut" Brown: vocals
Released on Bluebird B5447

Listen to a sample here:

http://www.allmusic.com/song/stockade-blues-mt0005533098



(c) Ernest "Mexico" Williams, "Midnight Special" (AFS CYL-11-5, 1933)

Listen to a sample here:

http://www.allmusic.com/album/jail-house-bound-john-lomaxs-first-southern-prison-recordings-1933-mw0002427915



(c) Jesse Bradley, "Midnight Special" (AFS 218 A1, 1934)

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http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.afc.afc9999005.714/default.html



(c) Frank Jordan & Group, "Midnight Special" (AFS 619 A1, 1936)

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http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.afc.afc9999005.1851/default.html



(c) State Street Boys (1935)

Recorded Chicago, January 10, 1935
Harmonica – Jazz Gillum
Piano – Black Bob
Violin – Zeb Wright
Vocals and Guitar – Big Bill Broonzy


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Listen here:




(c) Leadbelly (1934)
The person most responsible for spreading the popularity of "The Midnight Special" was doubtless Huddie Leadbetter. "Leadbelly"..recorded the song several times in his career. The earliest was in July 1934 when John Lomax recorded him for the Library of Congress in the Louisiana State Prison Farm at Angola. (AFS 124A-1)

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 http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.afc.afc9999005.468/default.html

Listen here:





Released in 1965 on Elektra EKL 301/302

http://www.atsf.co.uk/elektra/discography.php?from=2350&to=2580


(c) Leadbelly (1935)
The next year Lead Belly recorded "Midnight Special" in Wilton, Connecticut (AFS 133A)

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Listen here:

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/natlib/ihas/service/songinamerica/200196310/0001.mp3


(c) Leadbelly and the Golden Gate Quartet (1940)
Recorded June 15, 1940 in New York
Released on Victor 27266.

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Listen here:




(c) Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie and Cisco Houston (1946)
And in 1946 Leadbelly recorded a version with Woody Guthrie and Cisco Houston, that was released on the next album:

http://collectorsfrenzy.com/details/221157551549/LEADBELLY__MIDNIGHT_SPECIAL__DISC_726_78_RPM_ALBUM

Listen to a sample here:

http://www.allmusic.com/song/midnight-special-mt0008688848



(c) Delmore Brothers (1945)






(c) The Weavers and Gordon Jenkins Orchestra  (1952)
Released in Decca 28272 (#30 Hit in USA)

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Listen here:

http://incoming.jazz-on-line.com/a/_incoming/1952_310.mp3



(c) Joe Turner and His Blues Kings 1956 (as "Midnight Special Train")
 Recorded November 20, 1956 in New York)  .
Released December 1956 on Atlantic 1122

http://images.45cat.com/joe-turner-and-his-blues-kings-midnight-special-train-atlantic.jpg

Listen here:




(c) Josh White (1957)

http://www.discogs.com/Josh-White-Josh/release/2975281

Listen here: Click "PLAY" in the next link

http://www.mp3chief.com/j/josh-white-midnight-special



(c) Wilma Lee and Stoney Cooper had a top 5 country hit with the song in 1959 as "Big Midnight Special".

Listen and see them here in a 1963 show from the Opryland Library





(c) Paul Evans (1960) (as "Midnite Special") (#16 Hit USA)

Listen here:






(c) Harry Belafonte (1962) (titlesong of album)
(with a certain mister Robert Zimmerman on harmonica).

http://www.searchingforagem.com/1960s/1962Belafonte.htm

Listen here:





(c) Johnny Rivers (Live at the Whisky A Go Go) (1965) (US hit)
 Johnny Rivers' 1965 version was used as the theme song for the 1972-1981 NBC music-variety series of the same name, The Midnight Special.

Listen here and see him here:





(c) Van Morrison 1967

Listen here:





(c) The Beatles in 1969 during their Get Back Sessions.



Also covered by McCartney on his live Unplugged album as well as a regular part of McCartney's sound check set.





(c) Johnny Cash & June Carter 1970 (as "Big Midnight Special")
Recorded November 11, 1970 at The Ryman Auditorium, Nashville Tenn.
Aired on ABC Television for Johnny Cash's TV Show.

Listen here:





(c) Creedence Clearwater Revival 1970

Listen and see them here:






(c) Little Richard 1971

On Audio album King of Rock and Roll (1971)

Listen here:




(c) Mungo Jerry 1971

Listen and see him here:




(c) in 1974 by the Dutch band CCC Inc on the album "CCC Forever"

http://www.cccinc.nl/ccc/?page_id=200

Listen to a sample here:

http://cccinc.nl.webhosting22.transurl.nl/ccc/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/CCC1974Midnight_Special.mp3



(c) ABBA sang a medley of "Pick A Bale Of Cotton/On Top Of Old Smokey/Midnight Special"
Recording began on 6 May 1975 at Glen Studio. It remains ABBA's only release of material not written by themselves, and was originally released on the 1975 German charity album "Stars Im Zeichen Eines Guten Sterns". In 1978, it featured (with a slight audio tweak, for many years mistakenly referred to as a 'remix') as the B-side of the "Summer Night City" single.
Listen here:





(c) Sonny Terry & Brownie McGee 1977
Recorded in 1977 for the album "Midnight Special"

http://www.discogs.com/Sonny-Terry-Brownie-McGhee-Midnight-Special/master/276097

Listen here:




(c) Drukwerk (1982) (as "Schijn een lichtje op mij")  (#5 in the Dutch Charts)







Here you can hear a few more versions:

http://www.akh.se/lyrics/midnight_special.htm

And here much more versions:

http://www.secondhandsongs.com/performance/105910



VARIATIONS:

The "Midnight Special" tune is, in part, a variant of the chorus of the 1900 ragtime pop tune "Creole Belles".
Composed by Jens Bodewalt Lampe:

http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/scriptorium/sheetmusic/n/n06/n0609/

The part which is similar to the tune of "Midnight Special", is the part from 43 seconds in the next YT.




That part was also used by Mississippi John Hurt for his "My Creole Belle".





"Midnight Special's" TUNE, is ALSO VERY SIMILAR to the old (19th century??) negro spiritual "Let The Church Roll On".

The oldest recording seems to be made by the Rev C.D. Montgomery on January 31, 1925
Released on the Columbia-label (#15023-D) (as "Who Was Job ? part II")
Interestingly, this record of a black preacher was pressed on the Hillbilly 15,000 series to be marketed to a Southern white audience.

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Listen here:





(c) Norfolk Jubilee Quartet in (October 1926 on Paramount 12468)

Listen here:





(c) Mount Zion Baptist Quartet (March 9, 1927 on Victor 20582)

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Listen here:





(c) Thankful Qt (March 19, 1927 on Okeh 84573)




(c) Rev. Sim (April 18, 1927 on Gennett 6123)

(c) Cornfed Four (November 6, 1930 on Okeh 8841)

(c) Carter Family (May 25, 1931 on Victor 23618)

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Listen to a sample here:

http://www.allmusic.com/song/let-the-church-roll-on-mt0008952383



"Sail Away Ladies" also uses a TUNE that is similar to "Midnight Special".
Listen to Uncle Dave Macon's version from 1927.







NOT to be confused with Sodarisa Miller's "Midnight Special" (1925) (on Paramount 12306), which is another song. It was an answer song to "The Sunshine Special".



zondag 21 juli 2013

Amen (1942 / 1950 / 1963)


The roots of "Amen" lie in a Negro spiritual, but the song first gained notice when a Jester Hairston-arranged version was lipsynched by Sidney Poitier in the motion picture drama Lilies of the Field, which opened in the fall of 1963.
But there were several versions that preceded the arranged version of "Amen" from that movie.


(o) Rev J.B. Crocker (1950) (as "Sermon, Hallelelujah Amen")
Composer/arranger: Rev. J.B. Crocker.
Recorded January 1950 on King 4372


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Listen here:





(c) Edna Gallmon Cooke with the Radio Four (1953)
Recorded November 1952.
Composer/arranger Ted Jarrett


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http://www.recordconnexion.nl/Republic/republic7040bar.htm

http://opalnations.com/files/Radio_Four_1952-1954_Heritage_CD_42_1999_.pdf

Listen here:





(c) Wings over Jordan Choir (1953)
Recorded in 1953 for the King-label.
Released on an EP (King EP-232) and on the album "Amen" (King-LP 519)


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Listen here:




The 1953 "Amen" version by the Wings Over Jordan Choir is almost the same version as Harry Belafonte's version from 1963 !!
So Jester Hairston most likely did NOT write "Amen", he adapted it at the most.
On the next EP scan of the 1953 Wings Over Jordan version of "Amen", I also don't see the composer's name Jester Hairston. I do see the names of Hogan and Davis.

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Some sources say Wings Over Jordan Choir already recorded "Amen" for the Victor-label, but I couldn't find any proof of that.

http://www.78discography.com/RCA203000.htm


EDIT: here's the PROOF: (thanks to Roel Vos)
Wings Over Jordan Choir: "Sweet Little Jesus Boy" / "Amen" (RCA 20-3242)

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Excerpt from Billboard Magazine, edition December 4, 1948



(c) Della Reese 1958

Interestingly, in Della Reese's version, the chosen pronunciation is "ah-men" -- retaining the vowel's longer sound -- as opposed to the more common "ey-men"





(c) Donald Byrd (1959)

Final track from Donald Byrd's "Fuego" album. Recorded at Van Gelder Studios on October 4, 1959. Donald Byrd, trumpet; Jackie McLean, alto sax; Duke Pearson, piano; Doug Watkins, bass; Lex Humphries, drums.

Listen here to Donald Byrd's instrumental version:





(c) Marv Meredith (1960) (as " Salvation Rock")

Marv Meredith's instrumental "Salvation Rock" (essentially a version of "Amen") reached the Music Vendor national Top 100 in 1960.



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Listen here (at 1 hour 17 minutes and 38 seconds in the next Christmas Mix of rare 45s:

https://soundcloud.com/#tis1971/new-mix-holiday-soul-volume-2



In 1963 "Amen" was used in the film "Lilies of the Field" with Sidney Poitier.

Homer Smith (Sidney Poitier) is an itinerant handyman/jack-of-all-trades who stops at a farm in the Arizona desert to obtain some water for his car. There he sees several women working on a fence, very ineptly. The women, who speak very little English, introduce themselves as German, Austrian and Hungarian nuns. The mother superior, the leader of the nuns, persuades him to do a small roofing repair. He stays overnight, assuming that he will be paid in the morning.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lilies_of_the_Field_(1963_film)

To pass the evenings, Smith (whom the nuns call "Schmidt") helps the sisters improve their rudimentary English (only Mother Maria speaks the language well enough to converse with him) and joins them in singing. They share their different musical traditions with one another: their Catholic chants and his Baptist hymns. He teaches them to join him in the call-and-response song "Amen" by Jester Hairston. Jester Hairston, who wrote the gospel arrangement of Amen used in the film, and who arranged the vocal parts, also dubbed the vocals for Poitier, who was famously tone-deaf.




(c) Harry Belafonte 1963.

On the label of his album "Streets I Have Walked" Jester Hairston gets the credit.
But on the cover of Belafonte's album it rather says "Amen: Negro Spiritual"

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=2158248

Listen here:




(c) Impressions 1964

http://www.discogs.com/Impressions-Amen-Long-Long-Winter/release/2008644

Listen here:





(c) Johnny Cash 1964

http://www.discogs.com/Johnny-Cash-Orange-Blossom-Special/release/1469177

Listen here:




(c) Rotary Connection (1967) (Composers (??): Charles Stepney & Marshall Paul)

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=389896

Listen here:




(c) Otis Redding (1968)

Otis Redding had a posthumous hit with his version of the song, reaching #15 on the R&B chart.
On the version of Otis it says: "Amen: trad. arr. by Otis Redding"

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=1482188

Listen here:




(c) Winstons (1969) (as "Amen, Brother")

The Amen break is a 6 second (4 bar) drum solo performed in 1969 by Gregory Cylvester "G. C." Coleman in the song "Amen, Brother" performed by the 1960s funk and soul outfit The Winstons.
The Winstons' version was released as a B-side of the 45 RPM 7-inch vinyl single "Color Him Father" in 1969 on Metromedia (MMS-117).

It gained fame from the 1980s onwards when four bars (6 seconds) sampled from the drum-solo (or imitations thereof) became very widely used as sampled drum loops in breakbeat, hip hop, breakbeat hardcore, hardcore techno and breakcore, jungle and drum and bass (including oldschool jungle and ragga jungle), and digital hardcore music. The Amen Break was used extensively in early hiphop and sample-based music, and became the basis for drum-and-bass and jungle music—"a six-second clip that spawned several entire subcultures." It is the most sampled drum beat of all time

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amen_break

http://www.ethanhein.com/wp/2011/the-amen-break/

Listen here: the heavy sampled break is at 1 minute and 27 seconds in the next YT.




(c) Ace Cannon (1969)  (writing credits Curtis Mayfield and Johnny Pate)

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=3807118

Listen at about 2 minutes and 40 seconds in the next YT




(c) Impressions (1970) (new version)  (writing credits Curtis Mayfield and Johnny Pate)

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=1204931




(c) Elvis Presley 1972 (medley: "I Got A Woman / Amen") (from "Elvis on Tour")

Elvis on Tour is a Golden Globe Award-winning American musical documentary motion picture released by MGM in 1972.
This film followed Presley as he embarked on a 15-city tour of the United States in April 1972.





(c) Elton John & Sounds of Blackness (1994)

http://www.discogs.com/Various-A-Tribute-To-Curtis-Mayfield/release/2015632

Listen here:




STILL OLDER VERSIONS:

But already in 1942 Woody Herman sang a version of "Amen", that was clearly derived from the spiritual "Amen"

The now-obscure Universal musical "What's Cookin'" was a showcase for the Woody Herman band, and also featured the Andrews Sisters, Jane Frazee, Donald O'Connor, and Gloria Jean. The semi-spiritual  "Amen" from the film turned out to be a hot record seller for both the Herman and Abe Lyman bands.

Woody Herman's version was originally issued on 78rpm: Decca 18346
"Amen" (Roger Segure-Bill Hardy-Vic Schoen)
Woody Herman & his Orchestra, vocal by Woody Herman and Ensemble,
Recorded April 2, 1942




Abe Lyman'version was released on 78rpm: Bluebird B-11542
"Amen" (Roger Segure-Bill Hardy-Vic Schoen)
Abe Lyman and his Californians, vocal by Rose Blane and Chorus.
Recorded May 19, 1942



In the above 2 versions by Woody Herman and Abe Lyman the word "Amen" is rather pronounced as "Hey Man".
And maybe that's the reason why in 1942 Curt Teich made a postcard joking with those 2 "white" versions.

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Or did the postcard made a joke of the 1942 version by the Four Vagabonds ???

http://www.document-records.com/fulldetails.asp?ProdID=DOCD-5636

Listen to a sample here: http://www.document-records.com/mp3/10104.mp3

maandag 15 juli 2013

Big Road Blues (1928) / Stop And Listen Blues (1930) / Dark Road Blues (1935) / Crying At Daybreak (1951) / Dark Road (1951) / On The Road Again (1953)


http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=523

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Road_Again_(Canned_Heat_song)


"Big Road Blues" - Tommy Johnson (1928)
Recorded February 3, 1928 at Memphis Auditorium, Memphis, Tenn.;
Matrix (41837-2)
Tommy Johnson, voc, g; Charlie McCoy, g
Released on Victor 21279


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The Mississippi Sheiks  had used Johnson's "Big Road Blues" melody in their successful "Stop and Listen Blues". Johnson was party to the copyright settlement, but was too drunk at the time to understand what he had signed to


Stop And Listen Blues - Mississippi Sheiks (1930)
Recorded February 17, 1930 Shreveport LA
Matrix 403806-A
Mississippi Sheiks (Walter Vinson (Jacobs) (g,v), Lonnie Chatman (vn)
Released on OKeh 8807

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Lyrics, part of the melody and even Howlin' Wolf's Smokestack howl in "Smokestack Lightnin" (1956) and his earlier "Crying At Daybreak" (1951) on their turn, are rooted in Mississippi Sheiks "Stop and Listen Blues"

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=5875


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Willie Lofton's "Dark Road Blues" was also based on Tommy Johnson's "Big Road Blues".

(c) Willie Lofton (1935) (as "Dark Road Blues")
Willie Lofton:Vocals & Guitar
Recorded in Chicago, IL. Friday, November 1, 1935
Originally issued on Bluebird B6229 (78 RPM)


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Canned Heat's "On the Road Again" was adapted by Alan Wilson from 2 songs by Floyd Jones, a Chicago blues musician: "On the Road Again" and "Dark Road", the last song was itself an adaptation of "Big Road Blues," recorded in 1928 by Delta blues musician Tommy Johnson.
Canned Heat credit Floyd Jones for borrowing the title and part of the lyrics from "On The Road Again" and some lyric lines from his "Dark Road".
The melody of Canned Heat's "On the Road Again" is pretty much their own, credited to Alan Wilson.


"On The Road Again" - Floyd Jones (1953)
Recorded January 31, 1953 in Chicago, IL;
Matrix (U2367)  
Floyd Jones, voc, g; Sunnyland Slim, p; Moody Jones, b; Alfred Wallace, dr
J.O.B. 1013

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"Dark Road" - Floyd Jones (1951)  
Recorded  March 22, 1951 in Chicago, IL;
Matrix (JB 35222, B)
Floyd Jones, voc, g; # Billy Howell, tp; Sunnyland Slim, p; Moody Jones, b; Alfred Wallace, dr
Released on J.O.B. 1001

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Besides influenced by Willie Lofton's "Dark Road Blues" (lyrics), the melody of Floyd Jones' "Dark Road" and "On The Road Again" also owes much to Howlin Wolf's "Crying At Daybreak" (SEE ABOVE)

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Here's Canned Heat's adaptation of Floyd Jones' "Dark Road" and "On the Road Again".
As I said above, the melody of Canned Heat's "On the Road Again" is pretty much their own, credited to Alan Wilson.
They released it as a single in April 1968, and it appeared on their 1968 album Boogie with Canned Heat as well as the 1969 compilation The Canned Heat Cookbook. It reached number eight on the UK Singles Chart and number sixteen on the Billboard Hot 100.





But already in 1966 Canned Heat had recorded a straight cover of Tommy Johnson's "Big Road Blues".

(c) Canned Heat 1966  (as "Big Road Blues")

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vintage_(Canned_Heat_album)





(c) Bonnie Raitt 1971 (" Big Road" )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnie_Raitt_%28album%29

"Big Road" was on Bonnie's first album

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More versions here:

http://secondhandsongs.com/work/2749/versions#nav-entity

More coverversions and the lyrics of Tommy Johnson's version:

http://www.keeponliving.at/song/big_road_blues.html






zondag 14 juli 2013

You Better Get Somebody On Your Bond (1924) / You'll Need Somebody On Your Bond (1929) / You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond (1930)


The subject of "You'll Need (or Better Get) Somebody on Your Bond" is "the idea that we will all need a legally binding guarantee to gain access to heaven" and that Jesus as our advocate "will provide us with a guarantee or bond, if we follow His ways"

http://www.originals.be/en/originals.php?id=7208

There is an older version of this spiritual than the most famous version by Blind Willie Johnson

The ORIGINAL version of this spiritual was recorded in New York City on April 21, 1924
by the Fisk University Jubilee Singers:
Carl Barbour, tenor
Ludie David Collins, bass
James A. Myers, tenor
Mrs. James A. Myers, alto
Horatio O'Bannon, baritone
Released on the Columbia label (#163-D)

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Or here:




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http://www.earlyblues.com/Essay%20-%20Roots%20of%20Blind%20Willie%20Johnson%20-%20Part%201.htm


(c) Charley Patton 1929 ("You're Gonna Need Somebody When You Die")

Recorded October 1929 in Grafton, WI and released on Paramount 13031.

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(c) Blind Willie Johnson 1929 - "You'll Need Somebody on Your Bond"

Recorded December 11, 1929 in New Orleans.
Released on Columbia 14504-D

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"You'll Need Somebody on Your Bond" (later titled "You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond") is a gospel song that is attributed to both tradition and to Texan singer and guitarist Blind Willie Johnson. Johnson recorded his first version of the song for Columbia Records as "You'll Need Somebody on Your Bond" on December 11, 1929, in New Orleans, Louisiana (SEE YOUTUBE ABOVE). He later recorded a second version titled "You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond" on April 20, 1930, in Atlanta, Georgia, which was Johnson's last recorded song (SEE YOUTUBE BELOW)
As with many of Blind Willie Johnson's songs, "You'll Need Somebody on Your Bond" is performed with Johnson on lead vocals and slide guitar and an unknown female singer accompanying him on vocals. While it was first believed that his wife Angeline Johnson provided those backing vocals, it has since been refuted by Johnson's lead biographer. The second version, titled "You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond" is nearly identical to the first, with slightly more subdued vocals and backing vocal provided by Willie B. Harris, sometimes considered to be Johnson's first wife


(c) Blind Willie Johnson 1930 ("You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond")
Recorded April 20, 1930 in Atlanta, GA
Released on Columbia 14530-D


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(c) Rev J.M. Gates (1929) ("You Gonna Need This Man Jesus On Your Bond")
Rev J.M. Gates, sermon; assisted by Deacon Leon Davis and Sisters Jordan and Norman.
Recorded December 16, 1929
Released on Okeh 8779.

Listen to a sample here:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gonna-Need-This-Jesus-Your/dp/B001GHFMOU




(c) Ravizee Singers (1937) (You'll Need My Saviour Too)

Listen to a sample here:

http://www.amazon.com/Youll-Need-My-Saviour-Too/dp/B001U9DK3E




(c) Muddy Waters 1942) (as "You Got to Take Sick an Die Some of These Days")

McKinley Morganfield vcl, gtr;
Recorded in prob. Clarksdale. Miss., poss. 20-24 July 1942
Matrix 6666-A-3
Recorded for the Library of Congress, released on Testament LP 2210, MCA CHD 9344

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(c) Buffy Sainte-Marie 1964

In 1964, Buffy Sainte-Marie recorded "You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond" with slightly altered lyrics and included the song on her debut album, It's My Way!. While her debut album did not chart, it proved influential to both the American and British folk communities. Sainte-Marie recorded the song on acoustic guitar without using a slide and sang without any backup vocals.

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(c) Donovan 1965

Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan recorded "You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond" in early 1965 for inclusion on his debut album What's Bin Did and What's Bin Hid. Since Donovan recorded a version of "Universal Soldier" after hearing it on Buffy Sainte-Marie's debut album, it is likely that he first heard "You're Gonna Need Somebody on Your Bond" from the same source.
Also on this 45 http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=4274237

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(c) Captain Beefheart (1968) ("Yer Gonna Need Somebody On Your Bond")
One of the highlights of Captain Beefheart’s 1968 tour of the UKwas the concert at Frank Freeman’s Dance Club in Kidderminster. Fortunately legendary DJ John Peel brought his tape recorder and recorded four brilliant numbers from the show ao "Yer Gonna Need Somebody On Your Bond"

http://www.hhv.de/shop/en/item/captain-beefheart-frank-freeman-s-dance-club-310927

In addition, Captain Beefheart drew on the song for "Tarotplane", the opening track of his 1971-released album, Mirror Man.

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(c) Taj Mahal (1969)

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(c) Eric Bibb (1994)
Recorded in 1994 in Stockholm, Sweden

http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?release=3144983

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